Three Stages of Delusion

12/6/2010

Religion and Academia and Business and Science and High Finance…Humans without honesty and integrity are all the same ;/ . Time for us all to grow up : )

Three Stages of Delusion 

(By Dylan Grice, Societe Generale)

The recent sequence of reassurances from various eurozone policymakers suggests we are in the early, not latter, stages of the euro crisis. Only an Anglo-Saxon style QE will prevent dissolution of the euro. Such a radically un-German solution will only be taken with a full acceptance of how serious the euro’s problems are. But denial persists.

The dawning of reality hurts [whether the bad fruit of bad economic or political policies, or the bad fruit of attendance-based, clergy-dominated programmed religion]. Prodded and bullied along a tortuous emotional path by events unforeseen and beyond our control, we descend through three phases:

***the first is denial that there is a problem; ***the second is denial that there is a big problem; ***the third is denial that the problem was anything to do with us.

US policymakers’ three steps during the housing crash fit the template well. Asked in 2005 about the danger posed to the economy by the housing bubble, Bernanke responded: “I guess I don’t buy your premise. It’s a pretty unlikely possibility. We’ve never had a decline in house prices on a nationwide basis.” Here was the denial that there was a problem. But as sub-prime issues arose, Ben Bernanke reassured the world that they would be “contained.” And when Bear Stearns collapsed, Hank Paulson promised, “The worst is likely to be behind us.” Here was denial that there was a big problem.

Soon the financial system was on the brink of collapse. There could no longer be any credible denial of the problem, so the locus of delusions shifted: there was a problem, but it was someone else’s fault. Thus a ban on naked short selling of financials was implemented in Sept/Oct 2008, as though the crisis was somehow short-sellers’ fault. (It certainly wasn’t the Fed’s fault, according to the Fed. Ben Bernanke argued this year “Economists…have found that only a small portion of the increase in house prices…can be attributed to the stance of US monetary policy.”)

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